Boidnoise

Various nature recordings by Bernhard Kroeger

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  • recorded at the Gray Lodge Wildlife Refuge from the observation platform with the Telinga dish, twin science microphone and the SD722 recorder.  It was a sunny day with many hunters shooting in the background.  There is a mass takeoff and excitement at approx 1:45.

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  • recorded on the night of June 2-3, 2007 on Mosquito Ridge Road in Placer County, CA with a Marantz PMD-671 recorder and a Telinga dish and twin science microphone.  This is a clear, good quality mostly single hoot recording with a slight echoing quality.

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    this was taken a little later of a different owl.  The quality of the hoot is much different than the one above.  Between 00:05 and 00:10 there are faint audible clicks.  I don’t know if bats can emit clicks that are audible to humans, but bats were flying in the area at the time.

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  • Jon Winter kindly sent me a copy of his Some Critical Notes On Finding And Seeing The Flammulated Owland allowed me to include it on this website.

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  • recorded on July 19, 2007 at on the Lower Cascade Ditch in Nevada City, CA at 2235 with a Foster FR-2LE recorder and Telinga dish with twin science microphone.

    This is the 5 note call typical of the great-horned owl.

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  • recorded in Nevada County with  Fostex FR-2LE Telinga dish and twin science mic on July 20, 2007 at 0120.  This recording is 3:32 minutes long and contains 7 5 note territorial calls of a spotted owl.  There is roughly 30 sec of silence between calls, just as in real life.  It is a thrill to be able to see and hear these birds.  As most owls, they are capable of a mindblowing variation of utterances and vocalizations, and I don’t begin to understand what they might mean.  This call is faintly reminiscent of a neighborhood dog barking in the night, and most people would not be aware that they were listening to an owl.

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  • recorded with a Zoom H2 (see Equipment header above) which was set up on a tripod near my feeder which is stocked with black sunflower seeds year round.  This little snippet was lifted from a long recording.  The feeder has a steady stream of birds coming to it, and often there is a “line” and like people, some try to take “cuts” and feathers get ruffled.

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  • recorded last fall in Nevada County.  This “chittering” call seems to be an alarm call or sign of annoyance of the northern saw-whet owl.  It is of very short duration and in my experience not repeated.  When playing back or imitating the territorial call of this owl by whistling, I often hear this very quick “chitter” which then often leads to either a “wail” or “toot”.

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    This quick “gurgle” like call may be made by saw-whet owls.  It occasioally hear it in saw-whet habitat and in areas where saw-whets are vocalizing.  I’ve never seen the animal that makes this noise, so this is a guess based on hours out in the woods and gut feeling.  If someone is familiar with this sound, I’d like to hear from you.

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  • these files demonstrate the extreme variability, variations on a theme, and mimicry of the California thrasher.  The first files was recorded in the afternoon of March 8, 2008 in the chaparral on the top of Wolf Mountain, southwest of Grass Valley, California.  It is 7:30 minutes long and the bird averages 3 phrases per minute.

    At 1:36 the bird mimics an oak titmouse, at 3:55 a scrub jay and at 4:09 an oak titmouse again, this time very clearly.

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    In this recording in the same area, another bird mimics a blue-gray gnatcatcher between 0:21-0:23, and a scrub jay at 1:10-1:12 a scrub jay.

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    This is another phrase from the first bird.  In this I think I hear phrases from lesser goldfinch, scrub jay, and blue-gray gnatcatcher, but my ears are worn out right now and I could be dreaming.

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  • Recorded on Apr 19, 2006 early in the morning at Pajaro Dunes, CA.

    This is the typical “witchety, witchety, witchety” call of the common yellowthroat.  Photography by Walt Carnahan of Sierra Foohills Audubon Society.

    equipment: Telinga dish, Marantz PMD-671, twin science microphone

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  • This flock of evening grosbeaks was recorded on Sunday morning Oct. 5, 2008 at Prosser Reservoir east of Truckee, California.  Sunny morning after two days of rain, and a cool 40 degrees.  The birds were flying between treetops and were very active.  At 51 seconds many of them take off in a great whir of wings and move on.

    equipment: Sound Devices 722, Telinga dish, twin science microphone

    cast of characters: evening grosbeaks, mountain quail, Steller’s jay, mountain chickadee, Brewer’s blackbird

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    Not long after I started recording this flock the apparently obligatory EXPLETIVE motorcycles started arriving as they do most any place one tries to record.  It was 0845 on a beautiful Sunday morning.  Clueless bunch, for whom nature only exists to roar through, making as much noise as possible.  This is what it sounds like.

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